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20,000 'Call Of Duty: Warzone' Cheaters Have Just Been Banned

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20,000 'Call Of Duty: Warzone' Cheaters Have Just Been Banned

Call Of Duty: Warzone's sixth season started off with a bang earlier this week when developer Infinity Ward swung down its mighty ban hammer once again. In an impressively comprehensive fresh wave of bans, roughly 20,000 cheaters have been blocked from returning to Verdansk to enjoy everything the new season of content has to offer.

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A report from Vice claims that the bans came after Activision found detected many of the offending players using a popular cheat. People close to the matter have suggested that Twitch Streamer Nick Wagner was caught using EngineOwning, a popular subscription-based cheat service. It's unconfirmed whether the majority of banned players also used the same service.

It is worth noting, however, that the EngineOwning website lists its cheats for Call Of Duty: Modern Warfare and Call Of Duty: Warzone, as "detected," which means that Infinity Ward will be able to tell if you're using that software.

Call Of Duty: Warzone / Credit: Activision
Call Of Duty: Warzone / Credit: Activision
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The EngineOwning forums are now filled with two types of people: Those that knew the risks and are happy to accept their lot in life... and those that are furious they've paid for a subscription to cheating software that they can no longer use. My advice would be maybe don't cheat in a multiplayer game that will kick you out the door for doing so quicker than you can say "aim-assist" - but hindsight is 20/20.

While it's great to see that Activision and Infinity Ward remain committed to weeding out cheaters, it's a little troubling that banning rounds still produce such large numbers. Back in spring close to 70,000 hackers were removed from the game as Infinity Ward worked on "tough new measures" which, at the time, seemed to have had an effect.

The past few months have shown that cheaters are able to get into the game and do what they want - often rather brazenly. There have been reports of cheaters openly using their aim-assist software live during Twitch streams, while others openly boast about it on social media.

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Unfortunately, the issue is that the cheaters are willing to put in as much work as the developers attempting to weed out said cheating. EngineOwning site administrator AimBRoT said the team will continue to "work on the detection" and ensure that hackers can slip back into Warzone undetected. It seems like there really is no end in sight to this particular problem.

Featured Image Credit: Activision

Topics: Modern Warfare, Infinity Ward, Warzone, Call of Duty, Battle Royale, Activision

Ewan Moore
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