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New 'Jurassic World: Dominion' Teaser Shows Dinos With Feathers

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New 'Jurassic World: Dominion' Teaser Shows Dinos With Feathers

A poster and photo of Jurassic World: Dominion has been shared on social media, and the dinosaurs are actually accurate to their theoretical appearance all those thousands of years ago.

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As the sixth film in the Jurassic Park franchise and the culmination of the Jurassic World trilogy, the story will delve into the implications of the fact that the ability to clone and create dinosaurs is now possible by anyone with the cheddar (and garden space). However, we won't see velociraptors leaping into a Medieval Times and devouring the customers in some sort of horrendous timey-wimey bloodbath.

Director Colin Trevorrow was sure to explain that these dinosaurs are animals and are worthy of respect like any other creature. "A dinosaur might run out in front of your car on a foggy backroad, or invade your campground looking for food," said Trevorrow in an interview with Jurassic Outpost. "Dinosaur interaction is unlikely but possible-the same way we watch out for bears or sharks. We hunt animals, we traffic them, we herd them, we breed them, we invade their territory and pay the price, but we don't go to war with them. If that was the case, we'd have lost that war a long time ago."

True. Well, if you've ever hankered after the opportunity to run your own Jurassic Park with unpredictable animals that always, always seem to escape with ease, check out this trailer for Jurassic World: Evolution below.

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Trevorrow took to Twitter to publish a photo and a poster of the upcoming movie and the former clearly shows a moros intrepidus with feathers standing next to a giganotosaurus. To be transparent: I'm not a boffin. I just scrolled through the replies til Trevorrow told a fan which species of dino they were. Anyway, the most major aspect of the photo and the poster is that the reptiles have plumage, ensuring that they're more in line with what we know about dinosaurs today.


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This creative choice might ruffle a few feathers (I had to) because the 1990 novel explains that the geneticists supplement the recovered DNA of dinosaurs with other species that are alive right now. One of these is the common reed frog, along with lizards and birds, and this fact is used to justify why the cloned dinosaurs don't have feathers. Furthermore, in Jurassic World, the character Dr Henry Wu says that these animals have been genetically designed to look the way that the public expects dinosaurs to look. Fearsome jaws and scaly skin? Check. Moving on all fours and boasting colourful plumage? Nope.

Here's the thing. This part of the film with the moros intrepidus and giganotosaurus occurs 65 million years into the past. According to a chat with Empire, it's the start of Jurassic World: Dominion which shows off the giganotosaurus killing a tyrannosaurus rex. "It cuts to the modern day, and a sequence in which a drive-in cinema is under assault by the Rex we know from previous movies, with a military helicopter in hot pursuit," read the description, and those who head to IMAX screenings of Fast & Furious 9 will get to see this snippet for themselves.

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So, it's possible that the more modern creatures will have feathers as other people aside from Dr Wu are able to create them and add more bird DNA. This could be a controversial opinion but I do like the concept of dinosaurs with feathers of all hues under the rainbow. Doesn't it just make them cooler? Jurassic World: Dominion will come to cinemas on June 10th, 2022.

Featured Image Credit: Universal, Colin Trevorrow via Twitter

Topics: Movies, News

Imogen Donovan
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