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Halo TV Show Might Not Go Ahead Due To Lawsuit

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Halo TV Show Might Not Go Ahead Due To Lawsuit

There is a lawsuit going on between the original Halo composers and Microsoft, and the two plaintiffs Marty O'Donnell and Mike Salvatori are now "exploring the possibility" to block the TV show's release. The lawsuit surrounds unpaid royalties the pair should have received for use of their music in anything outside of the games. While they did receive some money they claim they were kept in the dark about figures and usage, and as such were underpaid.

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Microsoft's counter claim is that the composers were under work-for-hire meaning that Microsoft owns all the music written. O'Donnell and Salvatori say this was absolutely not the case - they were licensed and as such should receive royalties for use in products such as film, soundtracks, advertising, and TV shows. Naturally, their music is used a lot in the promotion of Halo products.

If you want to find out more about the Halo TV series you can check out the latest trailer in the video below.

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Most recently Paramount released a bizarre advert with a number of its characters such as Cartman from South Park and Butt-head from Beavis and Butt-head singing the monk chant from Halo, which O'Donnell and Salvatori wrote, in order to promote the upcoming release of the Halo TV show. Now, the 24 March release could be blocked if the pair go through with the motion. A pretrial conference discussing the terms - and if the case will go to trial - will take place on 9 March.

In an interview with Eurogamer on the topic O'Donnell said "We were like, 'Yes, we will sign over the publishing rights and the copyright on this music for Halo to Microsoft.' However, I wanted to do it the way it's done in movies and television, where the composers are still ASCAP (union) composers, and it's not a pure work-for-hire. There is a contract for any ancillary royalties - so use in commercials, use in anything outside the game, specifically, or sales of soundtracks. - We're just trying to get them to do this thing that we thought everybody agreed to 20 years ago."

Whichever way it goes it seems a conclusion will be reached before the TV show's presumed launch.

Featured Image Credit: Paramount / 343 Industries

Topics: Halo, TV And Film

Georgina Young
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