HAVE A VIDEO YOU WANT TO FEATURE ON OUR PAGE?

Submit Video
Advert

An Ode To High Hrothgar’s Frost Troll, Skyrim’s Rustler Of Jimmies

Published 
| Last updated 

An Ode To High Hrothgar’s Frost Troll, Skyrim’s Rustler Of Jimmies

I was flying through the air, having tripped and fallen off the side of a mountain, when I knew in my heart that The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim was a masterpiece I’d play forever. 

Advert

There was a moment at the beginning of my fatal descent when time seemed to freeze. I lay there, suspended in the air for what felt like minutes. I surveyed the spectacular view. Jagged mountains surrounded me. A raging river and unforgiving jut of sharp rocks waited below. It was epic and beautiful, and I couldn’t wait to explore it all. To unlock its secrets and learn everything there was to know about this beautiful land. And then I hit the ground, crumpled like a sack of old crisps, and died. 

Loading…

Like most people who’ve played it, I regard Skyrim as one of the greatest games ever made. It’s a sprawling, dizzying, wonderful piece of work that, even ten years later, still finds new ways to surprise me. It’s a game packed full of memorable quests and brilliant moments, but what’s the one I always find myself coming back to - the one I believe is the definitie example of what makes Skyrim the game it is? 

Advert

For me, it will always be the Frost Troll that guards the path to High Hrothgar. 

This Frost Troll in particular has become something of a meme among the Skyrim community. He is the Rustler Of Jimmies. The first monster you’re likely to run into teaches you the hard way that there are some things in Skyrim that will absolutely kick your arse if you’re not prepared. It is a brutal lesson, and unashamedly so. 

Assuming you’ve not strayed too far from the beaten path and have been intrigued enough to meet with the Greybeards who live atop High Hrothgar as soon as they summon you, climbing the 10,000 steps is probably Skyrim’s first real challenge. Lower level players will struggle their way up the mountain, but it’s not until the Frost Troll comes bounding out of the milky white tundra towards the end of your pilgrimage that things really take a turn. 

Advert
The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim/ Credit: Bethesda
The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim/ Credit: Bethesda

I remember my first ever meeting with the beast. Having scaled the mountain easily enough, and knowing this was part of the early game’s main questline, I (wrongly) assumed this new monster would fall easily enough. I let fly a handful of arrows, which sunk into its chest and head. It did a decent amount of damage, but didn’t seem too fussed by my attack. 

With a horrified lurch, I realised the troll’s health was slowly starting to regenerate. In fact, I soon discovered that its health was going back up quicker than my arrows could take it down. And it was getting closer. 

Advert

I began to back away, firing off more arrows as the demon advanced. As soon as it came within range, it swung for me and took half of my health with it. It was at this moment I learned three very important lessons about Skyrim

1: Always make sure you’ve packed enough health potions and food

2: Always assume that there’s something capable of killing you right around the corner

Advert

3: Never, ever take your eye off the enemy. Unless you’re on a mountain, in which case make an effort to look behind you at least once, or you will plummet off the side and die. 

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim/ Credit: Bethesda
The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim/ Credit: Bethesda

Needless to say, I reloaded an earlier save, marched back up the mountain, and sprinted past the Frost Troll to the safety of the Greybeards. Because that’s what heroes do. 

That Frost Troll had well and truly mugged me off. But I didn’t mind. Escaping Helgen and seeing a dragon lay waste to a town might have been the intended opening to Skyrim, but having the crap beaten out of me by a random and completely unexpected enemy was the real introduction to the game for me. 

It was at this moment, flying through the air and about to die, that I realised Skyrim was a game where anything could happen. I knew that one day I’d be able to come back with better weapons and skills and destroy this Frost Troll, and that was thrilling to me: the idea that this was a completely wild world that would constantly pull the rug out from under me. One I could attempt to conquer, but perhaps never fully understand. 

Hearing friends’ experiences with the Frost Troll atop High Hrothgar only solidified my love for the game. Some were like me, and were immediately killed. Others got lucky and just about managed to take it down, while others snuck past or simply ran away. A few were so powerful by the time they finally went to visit the Greybeards that they had no idea why we were all so scared about one measly Frost Troll. 

Everyone had their own experience with it. Their own story to tell. That, to me, perfectly encapsulates why we’re all still playing Skyrim and sharing our stories, ten years later. 

Featured Image Credit: Bethesda

Topics: Skyrim, Bethesda

Ewan Moore
More like this
Advert
Advert
Advert

Chosen for YouChosen for You

PlayStation

'Solar Ash' Review: 2021’s Coolest Game Is A Sci-Fi 'Shadow Of The Colossus'

18 hours ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read