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Activision Blizzard Accused Of Destroying Evidence Of Employee Abuse

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Activision Blizzard Accused Of Destroying Evidence Of Employee Abuse

A development in the lawsuit levied at Activision Blizzard from the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing has asserted that the company shredded evidence of improper conduct towards its employees.

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Last month, the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing announced that it was taking legal action against the publisher of Call Of Duty following an investigation comprising years of alleged abuse inside its offices. Before leaving to "pursue new opportunities," president J. Allen Brack called the accusations "extremely troubling." Activision Blizzard itself has denied the "distorted" claims made in the complaint and described the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing as "unaccountable State bureaucrats."

Over 2,000 employees had signed an open letter to the higher-ups at the company asking that they "recognize the seriousness of these allegations and demonstrate compassion for victims of harassment and assault." However, this latest update in the case claims that Activision Blizzard has resisted the investigation and even destroyed evidence that could bolster the stories coming out of the company.

'Call Of Duty: Warzone' / Credit: Activision Blizzard
'Call Of Duty: Warzone' / Credit: Activision Blizzard
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In response to these allegations, the publisher supplied a statement to Kotaku. "Throughout our engagement with the DFEH, we have complied with every proper request in support of its review even as we had been implementing reforms to ensure our workplaces are welcoming and safe for every employee," it said and detailed new approaches to hiring, recruitment, pay equity, training, employee reviews and sanctions for harassment and inappropriate behaviour.

"We strive to be a company that recognizes and celebrates the diverse talents and perspectives that lead to the creation of great, globally appealing entertainment. We have provided the DFEH with clear evidence that we do not have gender pay or promotion disparities," continued the company and denied the allegation that it shredded evidence that would have been vital to the lawsuit. "Our senior leadership is increasingly diverse, with a growing number of women in key leadership roles across the company."

'Overwatch 2' / Credit: Activision Blizzard
'Overwatch 2' / Credit: Activision Blizzard
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Activision Blizzard chief compliance officer Frances Townsend stepped down from her role in the women's network following criticism of her response to the lawsuit. She called it "meritless and irresponsible" in an internal email to staff and tweeted an article titled "The Problem With Whistleblowing" on her personal account. "We are glad she listened," said the ABK Workers Alliance which called for Townsend's departure from the women's network. "[We] hope that this will be followed by leadership addressing employees' other demands."

Featured Image Credit: Activision Blizzard

Topics: Blizzard, World of Warcraft, Call of Duty, Activision

Imogen Donovan
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