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Four Things We Want From ‘The Matrix Resurrections’

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Four Things We Want From ‘The Matrix Resurrections’

Coming 22 years after the first movie, The Matrix Resurrections has caught the public eye with emphatic aplomb. Already, fan theories about Keanu Reeves' latest adventure are flying around the internet, with suggestions ranging from the new movie undoing the two before it, to it being a spiritual reboot similar to Star Wars: The Force Awakens (according to GAMINGbible's own Tom Ryan-Smith). Personally, I don't see it being either of these.

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In truth, there are few things I'd argue we'd all appreciate seeing from this latest instalment in the Matrix franchise. It's safe to say neither Reloaded or Revolutions came close to the sheer brilliance of 1999's original film. It was always going to be a hard act to follow, but the second and third films were particularly wide of the mark, with only contrarians defending them, for the most part.

Watch the trailer for The Matrix Resurrections here

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So as we look to this new chapter, we're all understandably nervous about what we could be getting here. So, here's our list of things we'd like to see in The Matrix Resurrections.

The Matrix Resurrections / Credit: Warner Bros.
The Matrix Resurrections / Credit: Warner Bros.

A Return To Basics

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The Matrix didn't hold back on the philosophy when it was released back in 1999. The film's core concept of pulling at the threads of reality made for some fascinating discussions, from the true taste of foods, to the human condition, to what constitutes 'real' and whether or not that makes us happy. In fact, the main cast were even required to read Jean Baudrillard's Simulacra and Simulation, a book which goes to great depths in order to understand this part of the shared existence.

Despite all that, the original movie managed to keep things just light enough from a philosophical point of view by speaking in rhetorical questions, and highlighting Neo's lack of knowledge to give us a relatable protagonist. It was alright that we were blown away by these ideas because Neo was equally lost in all of it. That was until he figured some of it out for himself.

The problem here is as Neo learned more, the sequel movies had to hit him with more issues, some of them being tediously esoteric. For instance, when Neo meets the Architect in The Matrix Reloaded and learns he is an integral part of the eponymous Matrix, there's not much excitement there. Maybe it's because it doesn't feel as accessible to the viewer, or perhaps it's because it takes away from the hero's actions so far. Personally, I felt it was putting too fine a point on things, and that meant the mystery of the Matrix was lost. Either way, it shows The Matrix as a series is better off leaving more things unexplained.

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The Matrix / Credit: Warner Bros.
The Matrix / Credit: Warner Bros.

Impacting Fight Scenes

The first movie had some of the greatest fight scenes in all of cinema - and yes, I am prepared to die on this hill so leave it. From the opening skirmish where Trinity's mid-air pose stunned audiences worldwide, to Morpheus and Neo sparring, The Matrix knew what it took to deliver a fight scene that left you satisfied. Sadly, these cathartic moments were lost in the second and third instalments.

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When Neo faced off against Agent Smith in the train station during the first movie's thrilling final act, there was a real feeling of stakes. Scenery was damaged. Neo was bloodied and dirty. Agent Smith's sunglasses paid the ultimate price. This was a visceral fight scene between two strong, but not infallible, warriors. Sadly, when they have their rematch in The Matrix Reloaded, things lose something.

During that iconic scene where Neo faces a whole horde of Smiths, nothing really seems on the line. We have invincible Neo versus a seemingly never-ending force. The blood and dirt are gone. Everything is cleaner and less engaging. What I'm saying is I want the next Matrix film to channel the spirit of the first movie's combat sections.

The Matrix / Credit: Warner Bros.
The Matrix / Credit: Warner Bros.

A Recreated Minigun Scene

I'm not here to say The Matrix Resurrections should be a remake per se, but I would love to see one moment reimagined with modern technology. I speak, of course, about the thrilling minigun scene during the scene where Neo and Trinity rescue Morpheus.

When I first saw this as a nine-year-old child, I was speechless. The intense look on Neo's face. The bullets tearing through the water. The ammo casings raining down as the chopper holds its position. Just thinking about it gives me a tingle down my spine.

Now imagine what that would look like now, with today's CGI capabilities. Imagine changing it up and having a captured Neo being rescued by Trinity, or whoever Yahya Abdul-Mateen II is playing. I'm salivating at the prospect.

The Matrix / Credit: Warner Bros.
The Matrix / Credit: Warner Bros.

Neo Getting A Happy Ending

Our beloved Mr. Anderson got a rough deal at the end of the third movie. The man loses his eyesight, and the love of his life, in a truly devastating end to what was originally a trilogy. It was made even worse by the fact he managed to save Trinity in Reloaded, only for her to perish anyway in Revolutions. Then to top it off, Neo is apparently killed off. Teenage me was livid at all of this.

However, Neo appears to be alive in The Matrix Resurrections. Yes, he seems to have amnesia, possibly caused by the Blue Pills he's taking, but our boy is still going. I mean, this could be another iteration of Neo, but even then it still sets up the chance for a Neo to finally get his happily ever after.

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The Matrix 5

Featured Image Credit: Warner Bros.

Topics: TV and Film, Warner Bros.

James Daly
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